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Reference

Title: Terça edição da pesquisa sobre o impacto da pirataria no setor de consumo
Author: [IBOPE]
Source:

Federação das Indústrias do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (FIRJAN)
http://www.firjan.org.br/lumis/portal/file/fileDownload.jsp?fileId=2C908CE9215B0DC4012163A14F37666B

Year: 2007

Details

Subject/Type: Counterfeiting, Piracy
Focus: Apparel and Shoes, Brands (deceptive counterfeits), Brands (non-deceptive counterfeits), Fashion Accessories, Personal Care Products, Toys, Video Games, Watches
Country/Territory: Brazil
Objective: To measure the consumption of counterfeits and to evaluate attitudes towards them.
Sample: 2,226 Brazilians aged 16+ in São Paulo (602), Rio de Janeiro (602), Belo Horizonte (511) and Recife (511)
Methodology: Interviews

Main Findings

In 2007, 73% of Brazilian consumers have purchased pirated/counterfeited goods at least „infrequently”. 27% report never buying counterfeits. 80% agree that counterfeiting hurts big brands that as a consequence invest less and generate less employment; 71% agree that buying fakes deprives the government of revenues it could spend for health, education or housing. 56% of consumers are confident that they can at least in the majority of times distinguish between the original and the pirated product.

72% of counterfeit buyers reportedly only buy counterfeit goods when their financial situation does not permit them to acquire the genuine alternatives. 79% worry most about quality when buying counterfeits. Buying fakes tends to be socially acceptable, albeit with limits: 36% of counterfeit good consumers report feeling bad when buying fakes because it is not right to do so; 16% feel ashamed and avoid telling anybody that they purchased fake products; 64% do not consider buying counterfeits as a form of protest against the rich and powerful; 53% do not take pride in letting other persons know about how much money they supposedly “saved” by opting for the counterfeit, rather than the original.

During the last 12 months, counterfeit buyers have most often acquired the following items: clothes (19%), toys (16%), batteries (12%), sports shoes (10%), watches (10%), sunglasses (10%), fashion accessories (8%), pens (7%), video games (6%), and perfumes (5%).

[Date Added: Mar 12, 2010 ]