Budapest Notification No. 217
Budapest Treaty on the International Recognition of the Deposit of Microorganisms for the Purposes of Patent Procedure

Communication of the Government of the Kingdom of Spain Relating to the Extension of the List of Kinds of Microorganisms Accepted for Deposit by the Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo (CECT)

The Director General of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) presents his compliments to the Minister for Foreign Affairs and has the honor to notify him of the receipt, on April 19, 2004, of a written communication, dated April 12, 2004, from the Government of the Kingdom of Spain, informing the Director General of WIPO that the list of kinds of microorganisms accepted for deposit by the Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo (CECT), an international depositary authority under the Budapest Treaty on the International Recognition of the Deposit of Microorganisms for the Purposes of Patent Procedure, done at Budapest on April 28, 1977, as amended on September 26, 1980 (see Budapest Notification No. 106 of April 27, 1992), has been extended to include plasmids. The attached annex contains the updated list of kinds of microorganisms which may be deposited with CECT.

May 10, 2004


ANNEX

SPAIN
INTERNATIONAL DEPOSITORY AUTHORITY

Colección Española de Cultivos Tipo (CECT)
Universidad de Valencia
Edificio de Investigación
Campus de Burjasot
46100 Burjasot (Valencia)

Telephone: (34-96) 354 46 12
Facsimile: (34-96) 354 31 87
E-mail: cect@uv.es
Internet: http://www.cect.org

KINDS OF MICROORGANISMS THAT MAY BE DEPOSITED

Bacteria, including actinomycetes, which may be preserved, without any significant alteration of their properties, by freezing or freeze-drying, and which belong to a risk group lower than group 2 according to the definition of the United Kingdom Advisory Committee on Dangerous Pathogens (ACDP) 1984, Categorization of Pathogens according to Hazard and Categories of Containment (HMSO, London, ISBN 0-11-883761-3).

Plasmids, filamentous fungi, including yeasts, with the exception of strains known to be human, plant and animal pathogens, which may be preserved by freezing or freeze-drying without any significant alteration of their properties.

The CECT does not accept the following biological material for deposit: anaerobic microorganisms (except Clostridium); algae and cyanobacteria; embryos; protozoa; animal cell lines; plant cell lines; mycoplasm; plant seed; viruses; bacteriophages.

Notwithstanding the foregoing, the CECT reserves the right to reject or accept for deposit any material which, in the opinion of the Director, represents a risk that is either unacceptable or too difficult to handle.