Other IP Treaties

Contracting Parties  >   Convention relating to the Status of Stateless Persons > Netherlands 

 
Date
SignatureSeptember 28, 1954
RatificationApril 12, 1962
Entry into forceJuly 11, 1962

Declarations, Reservations etc.

Declaration made upon ratification:
"The Government of the Kingdom reserves the right not to apply the provisions of article 8 of the Convention to stateless persons who previously possessed enemy nationality or the equivalent thereof with respect to the Kingdom of Netherlands;
With reference to article 26 of the Convention, the Government of the Kingdom reserves the right to designate a place of principal residence for certain stateless persons or groups of stateless persons in the public interest."

Territorial Information

By a communication received on 30 December 1985, the Government of the Netherlands informed the Secretary-General that "the island of Aruba which was a part of the Netherlands Antilles would obtain internal autonomy as a separate country within the Kingdom of the Netherlands as of 1 January 1986". The said change would have no consequence in international law. The treaties concluded by the Kingdom which applied to the Netherlands Antilles, including Aruba, would continue, after 1 January 1986 to apply to the Netherlands Antilles (of which Aruba is no longer a part) and to Aruba.
By a communication received on 11 October 2010, the Government of the Netherlands informed the Secretary-General that "[t]he Kingdom of the Netherlands currently consists of three parts: the Netherlands, the Netherlands Antilles and Aruba. The Netherlands Antilles consists of the islands of Curaçao, Sint Maarten, Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba.
With effect from 10 October 2010, the Netherlands Antilles will cease to exist as a part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. From that date onwards, the Kingdom will consist of four parts: the Netherlands, Aruba, Curaçao and Sint Maarten. Curaçao and Sint Maarten will enjoy internal self-government within the Kingdom, as Aruba and, up to 10 October 2010, the Netherlands Antilles do.
These changes constitute a modification of the internal constitutional relations within the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The Kingdom of the Netherlands will accordingly remain the subject of international law with which agreements are concluded. The modification of the structure of the Kingdom will therefore not affect the validity of the international agreements ratified by the Kingdom for the Netherlands Antilles: these agreements, including any reservations made, will continue to apply to Curaçao and Sint Maarten.
The other islands that have until now formed part of the Netherlands Antilles – Bonaire, Sin Eustatius and Saba - will become parts of the Netherlands, thus constituting 'the Caribbean part of the Netherlands'. The agreements that now apply to the Netherlands Antilles will also continue to apply to these islands; however, the Government of the Netherlands will now be responsible for implementing these agreements. In addition, a number of the agreements that currently apply to the Netherlands are hereby declared applicable, from 10 October 2010, to this Caribbean part of the Netherlands. The agreements concerned are listed in the Annex which also includes a declaration, regarding the International Covenant on Civil and Political rights, on the modification of the internal constitutional relations within the Kingdom.

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In the note accompanying the instrument of ratification, the Government of the Netherlands stated, with reference to article 36, paragraph 3 of the Convention, that "if at any time the Government of the Netherlands Antilles agrees to the extension of the Convention to its territory, the Secretary-General shall be notified thereof without delay. Such notification will contain the reservations, if any, which the Government of the Netherlands Antilles might wish to make with respect to local requirements in accordance with article 38 of the Convention."

Territorial application:
Date of receipt of the notification: April 12, 1962
Territories: Netherlands New Guinea and Suriname.