Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer

Andorra

Declaration made upon accession:
The Principality of Andorra accepts as compulsory the means of dispute as described in article 11 paragraph 3(a) of the Convention: the submission of the dispute to the International Court of Justice.

Bahrain

Declaration made upon accession:
"The accession by the State of Bahrain to the said Convention shall in no way constitute recognition of Israel or be a cause for the establishment of any relations of any kind therewith."
In this regard, the Government of Israel notified the Secretary-General, on 18 July 1990, of the following:
"In the view of the Government of the State of Israel such declaration, which is explicitly of a political character, is incompatible with the purposes and objectives of the Convention and Protocol and cannot in any way affect whatever obligations are binding upon Bahrain under general international law or under particular conventions.
The Government of the State of Israel will, in so far as concerns the substance of the matter, adopt towards Bahrain an attitude of complete reciprocity."

European Union (EU)

Declaration made on 23 May 1989:
"1. On behalf of the European Community, it is hereby declared that the said Community can accept arbitration as a means of dispute settlement within the terms of the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer.
It cannot accept submission of any dispute to the International Court of Justice."
"2. According to the customary procedures within the European Community, the Community's financial participation in the Vienna Convention for the Protection of the Ozone Layer and in the Montreal Protocol on substances that deplete the Ozone Layer may not involve the Community in expenditure other than administrative costs which may not exceed 2.5% of the total administrative costs."
Declaration by the European Economic Community in conformity with Article 13 (3) of the Vienna Convention for the protection of the ozone layer concerning the extent of its competence with respect to the matters covered by the Convention and by the Montreal Protocol on substances that deplete the ozone layer:
"In accordance with the relevant Articles of the EEC Treaty, the Community has competence to take action relating to the preservation, protection and improvement of the quality of the environment.
The Community has exercised its competence in the area covered by the Vienna Convention and the Montreal Protocol in adopting Council Decision 80/372/EEC of 26 March 1980 concerning chlorofluorocarbons in the environment (1), Council Decision 82/795/EEC of 15 November 1982 on the consolidation of precautionary measures concerning chlorofluorocarbons in the environment (2) and Council Regulation (EEC) N˚ 3322/88 of 14 October 1988 on certain chlorofluorocarbons and halons which deplete the ozone layer. The Community may well exercise its competence in the future by adopting further legislation in this area.
In the field of research in the environment, as referred to by the Convention, the Community has a certain competence by virtue of Council Decision 86/234/EC of 10 June 1986 adopting multiannual R& D programmes in the field of the environment (1986 to 1990)."
(1) OJ N˚ L 90, 3. 4. 1980, p. 45.
(2) OJ N˚ L 329, 25. 11. 1982, p. 29.

Finland

Declaration made upon ratification:
"With respect to article 11, paragraph 3 of the Convention Finland declares that it accepts both of the said means of dispute settlement as compulsory."

Holy See

Declaration made upon accession:
"In acceding to the Vienna Convention on the Protection of the Ozone Layer and the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer, as well as its four Amendments: London (1990), Copenhagen (1992), Montreal (1997) and Beijing (1999), the Holy See desires to encourage the entire International Community to be resolute in promoting authentic cooperation between politics, science and economics. Such cooperation, as has been shown in the case of the ozone regime, can achieve important outcomes, which make it simultaneously possible to safeguard creation, to promote integral human development and to care for the common good, in a spirit of responsible solidarity and with profound positive repercussions for present and future generations.
In conformity with its own nature and with the particular character of Vatican City State, the Holy See, by means of the solemn act of accession, intends to give its own moral support to the commitment of States to the correct and effective implementation of the Treaties in question and to the attaining of the mentioned objectives. To this end, it expresses the wish that by recognizing 'the signs of [an economic growth] that has not always been able to protect the delicate balances of nature' (Homily of Pope Benedict XVI at Loreto, 2 September 2007), all actors will intensify the aforesaid cooperation and strengthen 'the alliance between man and the environment, which must mirror the creative love of God, from whom we come and to whom we are bound'(Benedict XVI, After the Angelus, 16 September 2007)."

Israel

Following the declaration by the State of Bahrain, the Government of Israel notified the Secretary-General, on 18 July 1990, of the following:
"In the view of the Government of the State of Israel such declaration, which is explicitly of a political character, is incompatible with the purposes and objectives of the Convention and Protocol and cannot in any way affect whatever obligations are binding upon Bahrain under general international law or under particular conventions.
The Government of the State of Israel will, in so far as concerns the substance of the matter, adopt towards Bahrain an attitude of complete reciprocity."

Mauritius

The Government of Mauritius, upon acceding to the Convention, made the following declaration:
"The Republic of Mauritius rejects the ratification of [the Convention] effected by the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on 15 May 1987 in respect of the British Indian Ocean Territory namely Chagos Archipelago and reaffirms its sovereignty over the Chagos Archipelago, which form an integral part of its national territory."
Subsequently, on 27 January 1993, the Secretary-General received from the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland the following communication with respect to the declaration made by the Government of Mauritius:
"The Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland have no doubt as to British sovereignty over the British Indian Ocean Territory and their consequent right to extend the application of the [said] Convention and Protocol to it. Accordingly, the Government of the United Kingdom do not accept or regard as having any legal effect the declarations made by the Government of the Republic of Mauritius."

Netherlands

Declaration made upon acceptance:
"In accordance with article 11, paragraph 3, of the Convention the Kingdom of the Netherlands accepts for a dispute not resolved in accordance with paragraph 1 or paragraph 2 of article 11 of the above-mentioned Convention, both of the following means of dispute settlement as compulsory:
(a) Arbitration in accordance with procedures to be adopted by the Conference of the Parties at its first ordinary meeting;
(b) Submission of the dispute to the International Court of Justice."

Norway

Declaration made upon ratification:
"Norway accepts the means of dispute settlement as described in art. 11, para 3 (a) and (b) of the Convention as compulsory, that is a) arbitration in accordance with procedures to be adopted by the Conference of the Parties at its first ordinary meeting, or b) submission of the dispute to the International Court of Justice."

Sweden

Declaration made upon ratification:
"Sweden accepts the following means of dispute settlement as compulsory:
Submission of the dispute to the International Court of Justice [article 11, paragraph 3(b)]
It is, however, the intention of the Swedish Government to accept also the following means of dispute settlement as compulsory:
Arbitration in accordance with procedures to be adopted by the Conference of the Parties at its first ordinary meeting [article 11, paragraph 3(a)].
A declaration in this latter respect will, however, not be given until the procedures for arbitration have been adopted by the Conference of the Parties at its first ordinary meeting."